Miles Davis

Radio Broadcasts 1958-59 (JAZZ)

Radio Broadcasts 1958-59 Ver más grande

RLR 88632

Radio Broadcasts 1958-59

Miles Davis

RLR Records

8436006496325

RLR 116994

JAZZ

1

CD 8,22 €

Rare recordings that complete the output of the renowned Miles Davis Sextet, including outstanding improvisations by Miles, Trane, Cannonball and Bill Evans!!

This release contains all of the existing live recordings of the celebrated Miles Davis Sextet with the exception of the well known concerts at the Plaza Hotel and the Newport Jazz Festival. On the first broadcast at the Café Bohemia, "Cannonball" Adderley was absent, leaving a quintet fronted by Miles and Trane. The rarely heard November 1, 1958 and January 3, 1959 broadcasts mark the entries in Miles’ discography immediately prior to the sessions for the classic album Kind of Blue.

Track list:
01) FOUR 4:41
02) BYE BYE BLACKBIRD 6:45
03) WALKIN’ 6:23
04) TWO BASS HIT 1:37
05) WALKIN’ 6:32
06) ALL OF YOU 6:40
07) ‘ROUND MIDNIGHT 5:07
08) SID’S AHEAD 8:21
09) BYE BYE BLACKBIRD 6:13
10) STRAIGHT NO CHASER 3:29
11) BAGS’ GROOVE 14:00
12) ALL OF YOU 5:07
TOTAL TIME: 75:02

MILES DAVIS, trumpet
JOHN COLTRANE, tenor sax
On all tracks plus:
1-4: MILES DAVIS QUINTET:
Bill Evans (p), Paul Chambers (b), Philly Joe Jones (d). Café Bohemia, New York, May 17, 1958.
5-7: MILES DAVIS SEXTET:
Julian "Cannonball" Adderley (as), Bill Evans (p), Paul Chambers (b), Jimmy Cobb (d). Spotlight Lounge, Washington D.C., June 30, 1958.

8-10: MILES DAVIS SEXTET:
Same as 5-7 except Red Garland (p). Spotlight Lounge, Washington D.C., November 1, 1958.

11-12: MILES DAVIS SEXTET:
Same as 5-7 except Red Garland (p). Birdland, New York, January 3, 1959.

"The idea I had for this working sextet was to keep what we already had going with Trane, Red, Joe, Paul, and myself and add the blues voice of Cannonball Adderley into this mixture and then to stretch everything out. I felt that Cannonball’s blues-rooted alto sax up against Trane’s harmonic, chordal way of playing, his more free-form approach, would create a new kind of feeling, a new kind of sound, because Coltrane’s voice was already going in a new direction. And then I wanted to give that musical mixture more space, using the concepts I had picked up from what Ahmad Jamal did.
I heard my trumpet voice kind of floating over and cutting through all of this mixture, and I felt that if we could do it right, the music would have all the tension up in it."

Miles Davis (The Autobiography)